Everything You Need to Know About Business Proposals

Securing new clients is likely the biggest hurdle you will face as a business owner. It’s difficult to gain the trust of prospective clients without having them first try out your product or service, which is what business proposals are for. A business proposal is your way of introducing yourself to prospective customers as well as your way of explaining who you are, what you offer and why they should care, all in a single document. Yes, one single document could mean the difference between a bright future for your company or a swift end to your dreams. To make sure that the future of your business is a bright one, including the following in your proposal:

A Breakdown of Fees

Cost is the number one consideration that most people make before purchasing any product or service. If you offer a fee based service, make sure to breakdown for them what exactly the monthly or annual will get them. Include possible extra costs, how they will be invoiced, etc.

Availability

Probably one of the biggest complaints that customers of service-based businesses have is the lack of availability. Usually this grievance doesn’t stem from an actual lack of availability, but rather a lack of understanding of what to expect. It is reasonable for service-based businesses to check in once or twice a month, and to dedicate a few hours each month to a client (or more, depending on the monthly fee), but customers typically expect more unless they are told otherwise in the beginning. Make sure that your business proposal explains exactly what customers can expect in terms of availability. For instance, if you offer content marketing services, you can explain that the monthly fee means you will work for 10 hours a month on their account, that you are available during normal business hours to address any questions or concerns that they have and that you will hold a brainstorming session with them once a month via Google Chats.

Possible Changes to the Proposal

 Business plans change, and your proposal should account for those possible changes. If your current proposal is meant to hook a client with a special offer that is only good for the month of January, make that known to them, that way they don’t try to get a discount in March of April. Be transparent about your current fees and stipulations as well as your plans for your business’s future.

A business proposal may be the only opportunity to have to hook prospective clients. To increase your chances of success, implement the above tips before pitching a potential customer.

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